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You are here: Home --> Forum Home --> Creativity Forum --> Personal Creations --> Hazards
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Darren
RDI Fixture
Karma: 36/8
869 Posts


Hazards

(From the "Pardinal" page of Geography of Audalis)

Hazards (The Game): A game played on a board drawn with 16 by 16 squares. There are 16 pieces, each that have there own unique movement and powers. King, Queen, Prince, Jester, Rider, Guard, Farmer, Merchant, Priest, Mage, Bandit, Goblin, Courtier, Lady, Lord, Sailor. At the start of the game, each player must declare one piece as a spy, write that piece's name on a piece of paper and place under the edge of the board. The object of the game is to either to have the only king on the board, or to have your spy piece take the opponent's queen. Grand Hazards tournaments are played in Pardinal with much wagering on winners. It is widely believed that the first covenant was won by Josyph Solstice who beat King Leo V in Hazards.
On a whim, I decided to work on a playable version of Hazards. I'll need to fiddle a lot more with it, but I think I'm nearly there.
Anyone have any suggestions as to set-up or whatnot? Before I begin posting silly ideas.


Posted on 2012-09-29 at 15:05:56.
Edited on 2012-09-29 at 15:09:29 by Darren

Eol Fefalas
Keeper of the Kazari
RDI Staff
Karma: 453/28
7613 Posts


Whoa...

Very ambitious, Darren!

16x16 would make the board double the size of a chessboard, wouldn't it? Hmmmmm.... *ponders* .... I'll have to give some more thought to this as far as initial set up of pieces, etc, before I could offer input of even marginal value, but I'd be interested in hearing/reading any thought you might have already.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 15:05:13.

Alacrity
The Tired
RDI Staff
Karma: 291/33
6288 Posts


I did

I actually made the board and pieces at the time. A friend and I tried to play test it but it became complicated fast by my lack of skill in playing chess. I remember the corner pieces are an issue but do not remember why.



Posted on 2012-10-03 at 15:31:55.

Alacrity
The Tired
RDI Staff
Karma: 291/33
6288 Posts


Hey I have the file

This is all I have left of the work we did. I welcome you to use or discard whatever you wish.

Hazards
The game of Hazards originated from the mythical kingdom of Pardinal, in the world of Audalis (www.rdinn.com). The game is a reflection of life in Pardinal, specifically the intrigue and manipulations of the Pardinal royalty and court.

The game is played upon a 16 by 16 matrix board. The first four rows of the board is called “The Court”. The middle section of 8 rows is called “The Field” but is also called “The Open” or “The Heart” by some players. One set of pieces is traditional black while another is white, although variations do exist in Pardinal. King Julhoun I has an exquisite set done in ruby red and sapphire blue, the house rule to that set is the red moves first.

The Setup: At the start of the game, the pieces are arranged by the players behind a wooden screen, usually part of the hazard board container, so opponents can not see how their adversary will setup their defense. Also, one piece is designated a spy by a tapered red disk inserted in the hollow bottom of the piece. The spy has no greater power than the piece would normally have, except that if it takes the queen, the game is over (See Object of Hazards).Once a spy piece is chosen, it can not be changed at any point in the game. The back row is set the same for both players, however the front row eight pieces can be placed anywhere within the court, as the player deems fit.

The Object of the Game: The Object of Hazards is to defeat the opponent in one of two ways. Take the king or have the spy piece take the queen. Focusing upon the queen is referred to as “The Queen Gambit”. The strategy of seeking only the King is called “The King’s Court”. To try play both ways is known as “Leo’s Folly” and very few players can play Leo well.

The Rules: Once both players have set up their pieces on the board, they remove their shields and the game commences. Players move their pieces across the board in alternating turns, first move going to the player that is playing the black pieces. Piece movement is shown in detail below, and only one piece may be moved per turn. A piece must be moved in every turn, the option to pass is not available in this game. The most important rule in Hazard to remember is that no piece can be taken until the line between the field and court is crossed. One can not move from court to court to take a piece, unless a piece has moved into the field. To be the first to enter the field is called “breaking of the Heart” or “first blood on the Field”.

Front row pieces (Bandit and Goblins) are considered the most expendable of pieces. However if a Bandit piece makes it to the back of the opponent’s court edge, it can be swapped for any piece taken, including a spy piece, known or otherwise. If a Goblin piece reaches the back edge of the court, then it becomes a ????.

Taking the Piece: One Hazard piece can take another one only by moving into the square of the opponent’s. When a piece is taken in the game, it may or may not be the spy piece. Among true Hazards players, it is considered “bad form” to turn the piece over and see if it is the spy without first asking the opponent. This is an unwritten rule of the game that reflects greatly upon the honour and nature of the player. This adds another layer to the game of how much you respect your opponent and how much you trust them. Of course, the player can check the piece with or without permission, but many players feel it that by not knowing, it adds a dimension to the game that is lost by revealing the pieces. When a piece is taken, the player should take the piece from the board and place it on the right of the field. He then gestures with his right hand to the piece, palm up and fingers held downwards. The opponent then either waves the piece away with his right hand or with his left. The right means permission is granted, the left means it is not. Players who check without permission are referred to as “Travers” players. Players who do not ask and they do not check are called “Furidan” players. To play in a style that where permission is granted sporadically in order to throw off the opponent, is referred to as the “Menbren” style.

The pieces on either side:

Back Row: Sa Ps Me Ri Gu La Pr Qu Kg Sj Ld Ct Rd Mg Fr Sa
King (1)
Moves 1-3 spaces any direction, Can not jump, can take Pieces

Queen (1)
Moves straight or diagonal unlimited any direction, Can not jump, can take Pieces

Prince (1)
Moves diagonally up to 4 spaces any direction, Can not jump, can take Pieces

Sanjan (1)
Moves 5 spaces any direction, can jump one piece, Can take pieces but can not take and jump in same move

Riders (2)
Moves straight unlimited, Can not jump, can take Pieces

Guard (1)
Moves straight 3 spaces, can jump one piece, can take Pieces

Courtier (1)
Moves up to five spaces total with one turn (90 degree), can jump any number of pieces, can take Pieces

Lord (1)
Can Swap spaces with any opponent piece up to 3 squares away, or moves 1 space any direction. Can not take any Pieces

Lady (1)
Can Swaps spaces with any of same side's piece up to 3 spaces away, or 1 space any direction. Can not take any Pieces

Sailor (2)
Moves diagonal unlimited, Can not jump, can take Pieces

Farmer (1)
Moves 2 spaces any direction, Can not jump, Can not take a Piece nor can it be taken

Priest (1)
Moves 1 spaces any direction, Can not jump, Can not take a Piece nor can it be taken

Mage (1)
Moves 1 square any direction or “Teleport” to any unoccupied spot within 3 spaces of own King, Can take pieces but cannot teleport and take in same move.

Merchant (1)
Moves Straight or diagonal for 4 spaces, Can not jump, can take Pieces

Front Row:
Bandit (4)
Can move Diagonal 1-2 spaces, can not jump, can take via a 1 space move only, forward only

Goblin (4)
Can move Straight 1-2 spaces, can not jump, can take via sidestep of 1 space only, forward only.



Posted on 2012-10-03 at 15:35:08.

t_catt11
Fun is Mandatory
RDI Staff
Karma: 353/55
6390 Posts


lack of skill?

Don't trust Alacrity. He has dismantled me in chess enough times that I no longer care to be embarassed by him.

I would love to see this as a "real" game.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 15:48:59.

Alacrity
The Tired
RDI Staff
Karma: 291/33
6288 Posts


let me explain

My lack of skill at the time which was ... 2004. The lack of knowledge lead me to read up on chess but i am still learning the game. I got lucky against Olan and he won't play with me anymore.

He also won't play scrabble with me either. Bromern kicks my butt in scrabble regularly.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 15:54:32.
Edited on 2012-10-03 at 15:57:25 by Alacrity

Grugg
Gregg
RDI Staff
Karma: 357/190
6190 Posts


asdf

RDINN Jenga Tournament?

RDINN Jenga Tournament.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 16:12:38.

t_catt11
Fun is Mandatory
RDI Staff
Karma: 353/55
6390 Posts


luck???

You humiliated me multiple times in chess. That is not luck.

I'll play you in scrabble (I quit playing anyone for a couple of months). You're better than me, but that's okay; I have a chance there, at least.

Not so with chess.


Learning, my eye.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 16:17:56.
Edited on 2012-10-03 at 16:18:27 by t_catt11

Alacrity
The Tired
RDI Staff
Karma: 291/33
6288 Posts


haha

Is there an online jenga?


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 16:20:47.

Grugg
Gregg
RDI Staff
Karma: 357/190
6190 Posts


asdf

Probably not. But I will build the tower and then mail it back and forth between moves.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 17:27:51.

Alacrity
The Tired
RDI Staff
Karma: 291/33
6288 Posts


Shipping wars

WE could become regulars on shipping wars. Jenna tower, from Toronto to Alabama, must stay intact.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 17:32:37.

Darren
RDI Fixture
Karma: 36/8
869 Posts


Huh

I hadn't at all figured it like that. I'd got rid of the long-reach of chess pieces, and had literally gone by the one-of-each-piece idea, and had given each piece abilities (which makes it more of a strategy game than a board game, I suppose. Not that chess isn't based on strategy, but... bah, y'know what I mean)

The founding principle of this setup being, of course, having to prepare for being backstabbed at any moment.

I can't be bothered to type it all (right now) but here is basics. Names of zones and ideas are subject to change:

Win conditions: capture the opposing King, or capture the opposing Queen using a pre-determined "spy" piece, or own twice or more pieces than the opponent.
Note: for movement, differentiate between steps and moves. Steps are in one single direction, whereas a piece that moves can change direction. Also note that any number of pieces can be sacrificed on a turn, bearing in mind that you must maintain more pieces than half as many as your opponent.

Pieces: Royal King: one step, any direction; can promote any piece into Lord.
Queen: two steps, any direction; can promote any piece into Lady.
Prince: three steps, any direction; sacrifice to move King to Prince's square.
Noble Lord: two steps, any direction; sacrifice to gain control of enemy Farmer for one turn.
Lady: two steps, any direction; sacrifice to gain control of enemy Lord for one turn.
Courtier: three moves, any direction; sacrifice to gain control of enemy Jester for one turn.
Higher Priest: one step, any direction; sacrifice to resurrect any piece on starting row.
Merchant: two steps, no diagonals; sacrifice to gain control of enemy Bandit for one turn.
Mage: three steps, any direction, can jump pieces; sacrifice to destroy any non-Royal piece.
Rider: six moves, any direction; sacrifice to give another piece three extra steps/moves.
Lower Jester: four moves, only on diagonals; sacrifice to paralyse one enemy piece for their next turn.
Guard: two moves, any direction; when adjacent to a Royal or Noble piece, the piece cannot be taken until the Guard is taken or moved.
Sailor: five steps, only on diagonals; sacrifice to paralyse enemy Merchant and Mage for one turn.
Farmer: two moves, any direction can jump pieces; sacrifice to paralyse enemy Lord and Merchant for one turn.
Bandit: three moves, any direction; sacrifice to trap one unoccupied square, which is kept secret but written down. If an enemy piece lands on the square, it is destroyed.
Goblin: four moves, any direction; sacrifice to allow Goblin eight moves instead of four, then is destroyed.

The only thing I wasn't sure about was the placing of pieces on the board other than "on the back row", but doing it in secret? Sounds fun


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 19:33:18.

Alacrity
The Tired
RDI Staff
Karma: 291/33
6288 Posts


looks interesting

What I wrote up in 2004 is by no means canon and should be used for ideas only. Obviously, we didn't get far.

I am actually quite flattered that you have taken an interest in a idea I tossed around and if you want to run with it, feel free. I will read, follow and add my thoughts as I can.


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 19:40:55.

Darren
RDI Fixture
Karma: 36/8
869 Posts


Oh

Oh, and then that gave me an idea for a five-player version, with five different sides and piece-types; Farmers, Sailors, Merchants, Nobles and Royals.
Each of these factions has a "King" piece, two sets of different middling pieces, and a bunch of "Pawns".

Each faction has its own victory conditions, and the loss of the Leader piece doesn't mean the end of the game. If your faction loses its Leader, then you continue play, despite being unable to win. Why? To be able to sabotage other peoples' plans!

It's in the works. Gimme time on this one


Posted on 2012-10-03 at 19:55:16.

   
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